6 Most Common Rating Errors During Interview

Human Resorces

Sixs way to minimize rating errors is to make interviewers aware of the most common types of error, which are summarized below.

 

1. Rater Bias: Allowing prejudices about certain groups of people or personalities to interfere with being able to fairly evaluate a candidate’s performance. Interviewers should refrain from considering any non-performance related factors when making judgments.

 

2.Halo Effect: Allowing ratings of performance in one competency to influence ratings for other competencies. For example, allowing a high rating on Oral Communication to bias the rating on Problem Solving, irrespective of the candidate’s performance on Problem Solving.

 

3.Central Tendency: A tendency to rate all competencies at the middle of the rating scale (for example, giving all “3s” on a 5-point scale). When hesitating over making a high rating, interviewers should realize such a rating does not indicate perfect performance; it means demonstrating more of the competency than is generally exhibited. Similarly, when hesitating over a low rating, interviewers should realize it does not mean the candidate does not possess the competency; it means he/she did not demonstrate much of the competency in his/her interview responses.

 

4.Leniency: A tendency to give high ratings to all candidates, irrespective of their actual performance. There may be candidates who could benefit from further development in certain areas. Interviewers should allow their ratings to reflect these intra- and inter-individual differences.

 

5.Strictness: A tendency to give low ratings to all candidates, irrespective of their actual performance. There may be outstanding candidates whose demonstration of competencies warrants high ratings. Interviewers should allow their ratings to reflect these intra- and inter-individual differences.

 

6.Similar to Me: Giving higher than deserved ratings to candidates who appear similar to you.

 

People have a natural tendency to prefer others who are similar in various ways to themselves. Interviewers should concentrate on the responses given by the candidate in making evaluations, rather than on the outward characteristics and personality of the candidate.

Interviewers can minimize these rating errors by thoroughly understanding the competencies being assessed and by learning to compare the behaviors exhibited in the interview with the behaviors anchoring the proficiency-level ratings for each competency.

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